CONSIDERING AN IGUANA

Discussion in 'Iguanas' started by Laveau, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. Laveau

    Laveau Embryo

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    :) Live in Wa State and considering getting a common iguana. Researching as we speak btw and looking for a reputable breeder around here. My vet is going to send me caresheets on it. Although I am handicapped I can transfer its food and water and if there is food that the iguana eats that needs to be cooked then that can be done in a microwave oven or with a crockpot. For veggies and fruits that need cutting I use a knife that is designed for one handed use for my own food prep. Have an aide that comes in three to four times a week to help with housework. She has had an iguana before and she knows of someone else that has had one also. So she knows quite a lot about them. If I get an iguana then I do not want an iglet that was just hatched. Would want one that is somewhere between six and eleven months of age. Reason for that is that you are still able to bond with it and iguana is just about ready for checkup at dr's. Want male vs female because males don't lay eggs and females do. Oh and btw. Iguana would live "single and celibate". :)
     
  2. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  3. Jayme

    Jayme New Member

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    Just make sure you have the money and space for one. :eek: I hear a lot of iguanas are abandoned because they get too big. Another reason I've heard is that some can get aggressive as they age. So you'll want to look in to that and make sure that they're the lizard for you. ;)

    Would this be your first time keeping a reptile?
     
  4. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  5. Laveau

    Laveau Embryo

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    :) Thank you for your help. Actually I live alone. The only other individuals that live here are my cat and two birds and birds share a cage. Iguana would live in front room. Pretty sure that they would be good for me too cause iguanas are herbivores and apparently they have some form of therapeutic value. And even though they can get big that is kind of why I want one cause something that is somewhat big is easy to keep track of. Again. Does anyone know of a good breeder that I can go to possibly???? :)
     
  6. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  7. Louis Sibley

    Louis Sibley Embryo

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  8. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  9. Sharon Thompson

    Sharon Thompson Embryo

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    Had our iguana Fidget for 16 years; she died recently due to being egg-bound. She was in surgery at the time she passed, and we are devastated. This animal was the sweetest most loving creature you can imagine. Her diet was primarily chopped collard greens and assorted fresh fruits and other vegetables, all easily provided, but she occasionally would eat the dogs food, too. She loved to snuggle with her humans as well as take naps in the sun using our dogs as pillows; they loved each other. She was the best pet imaginable & I'm still crying over loosing her. I'm in Orlando FL & have a very nice iguana housing unit to sell if anyone wants one. I would say YES YES YES get that iguana spend a lot of time with him/her, be gentle, feed them well, and they will love you back.
     
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  10. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  11. Louis Sibley

    Louis Sibley Embryo

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  12. Louis Sibley

    Louis Sibley Embryo

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    You should think about igunanas. But I think a bearded. Dragon. There calm gentle thay will fall asleep on you and there very low matence and think that would be good for you
     
  13. Karlee

    Karlee Member

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    How much expierience have you had with reptiles? This isn't a begginners pet as you should know and can cost you a few pretty pennies. You need to have a cage that are at least these dimensions for an adult: 7/10/8. And in breeding season, males can get farely aggressive. They will try to run the house like an unruly dog. If you do get an iguana(s), I would suggest spaying and nuetering while young. My reason being is for the basic fact males won't get as aggressive (maybe not even aggressive) and females wont get egg binding. If you take this option take them to a good vet, you dont want them messing up and either kill or seriously injure your lizard. I hope this helps.
     
  14. reptileden0

    reptileden0 New Member

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    I have rescued, rehabed and kept many Iguanas over the years. My favorites are the rescues. They appreciate it. The rescues are hard on me though as I become attached and some were only with me a few years before their past caught up with them. Here is my mind on this matter as I have muscle and some mobility issues... Iguanas are very rewarding. They learn you and patterns and adhere to them. They potty train and communicate well. Find a herp vet and/or a confident vet for check ups, and nail trimming. I have had iguanas trained to get into a transport carrier with treats. Juviniles are a hand-full but tame out over time. I have one now whom potty trained well. has a daytime place next to a humidifier and his habit at night is to go to his enclosure. there are ways to "kid-proof" for iguanas. Especially if they escape enclosure or you want them to hang out with you on a regular basis.which should be considdered for climbing spots. I do not climb well. I have my drapery/curtains made of slick unclimbable material. The lizard's set up allows him to see outside but he cant get much higher than his 4 foot tall hang-outs. I have branches, climbs, basking spots and humidity all set up to keep him happy, active and feel safe..and keep him with in reach. I keep my house clean so he cant accidentally nibble anything bad..ie: toxic plants not allowed, no coins/nails/jewlery/medication laying around loosely. Tables and cabinets are clean as so he cant pull things down on himself or fall. Some he cant get to at all. My tv is on a secured shelf and is strapped to that shelf as previous lizards seemed to find a way to shove the electronics around. Safety for them first. I have vents screwed down so they cant get into vent system. Book shelves are a danger too so I keep some things out of reach. eliminate spots where the would get stuck if exploring. Lizard learned our movie shelf is impossible to climb. and so on.
    an iguana that has bonded with you will know when you are ill. they try to make you feel better and have even layed on my warm forehead and drew out the fevers. (hmmm heatrock!)
    Agression. Its a reality. Some develops from humans whom are afraid of the lizard. Tail presentation for whipping, threatening to bite and so on get worse if not dealt with and if the human backs off when threatened can be made much worse. Hold your ground. Show them their taill whaps are pointless and you dont care. use soft but stern words when they get too "big for their britches". If they try to bite, as most of my rescues have, offer a non bean clean stuffed animal/hand towel right into their mouth. they will get sick of or learn the toy is for releasing pent up energy on..ive had iggys even develop a fetch-type game with stuffed animals! ( youtube reptileden0's channel reptileden0@yahoo).
    Food... I have awesome food lists. let me know if you need it. Main foods: turnip greens, collard greens, mustard greens, kale, escarole, mango, papya, green beans, mellon, and so on.... no meats,onion, pastas, or citrus. make a salad example: of chop 1 bunch turnip greens, 1 bunch collared greens, a big mango, some avacodo or other fruit lightly mixed in. some stores have fruit pre cut up. the greens are main food. I mix and freeze the salad loosely so i can grab the daily portion easily.
    I have in the past used many reptiles as well as my wolves and pit bulls as therapy animals. the results are amazing.
    i could go on forever but I will stop here for now
     
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  15. Louis Sibley

    Louis Sibley Embryo

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    a comon iguana Aka green iguana
    Pet co dose not. Sell them. Because there. Mean.
    I have. A. Good. Size. Iguana
    There. Like. A person with bipolar You. Go to. Put your hand In there tank
    Thay. Will. Try to bit you. And. When you get. Bit it hurts like hell
    I. Said. When. Because you will get bit there's. No questions And you have. To hand feed them
    Because thay won't eat on there own
    Iam. Wishing I bought a. Gecko. Or. Another beareded dragon Not. A iguana
     
  16. Louie

    Louie Member

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    There are wild one's around here and as you know incredibly smart. Perhaps I am seeing to much but it seem's that the adults even know how to cross the street and they look to make sure no cars before crossing.
     
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  17. reptileden0

    reptileden0 New Member

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    Louie, very true!!!! I had a female that used to be very aware of stuff like that. plus loved rides. when she hears keys she would wait by her harness sayin " lets go!" she got so used to the cars I tries the arcade's Atari raceing game.. god bless her soul she could drive!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Louis, keep trying! All reptiles can bite. It comes with the territory. I have many scars and ugly fingers to prove it! If you cant continue with the iguana take your time to rehome it.
     
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  18. Louie

    Louie Member

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    Thanks that is what I thought as never owned one but see a few in area about once a week and have noticed the adults actually know how to cross the street while non of the feral cats,etc do.


    I imagine this is why many are not good pets because just like parrots they become bored as to smart for captivity.

    "god bless her soul she could drive!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

    Lol that is smart.
     
  19. reptileden0

    reptileden0 New Member

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    I have had so many iguanas come thru my home over the past 15+ years. Most got healed and got new humans. The ones I kept had such a strong bond, they wouldnt eat when I was gone except if ma fed them as her voice and looks are very close to mine.. (her ducks and chickens on the farm think I am her coming to feed them till they see my blonde hair)...
    you are right about boredom in critters such as iguanas. They are active critters. I give radio, tv and senic views to help keep them happy. I give them new items on a regular basis to check out. they like soft things alot.. For Lurb , as example, he was a rescue. He has been with us for just over half a year. He's not quite 2 years old. Had bad previous owners... he was under weight, had a tail break, and for some god awfull reason is missing all of his spines on his back. Only a few remain on his neck and he has tail ones.. But he has come to trust us. enjoys pets and rubs. Is potty trained. Has a wake up and bed time pattern established (flawless timing too as I think Iguanas can read clocks!-even thru time change!) he is learning the basics of come here, its ok, in, num nums (food time), and more . When we got him he was so traumatized he would attack the cage if you got too close. Any reptile is more than just a beast. they are thinking, feeling and acting critters. they care, bond, fear, and most of all...they REMEMBER almost every action us humans do with /to them. And they like soft and clean things.
     
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  20. Louie

    Louie Member

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    "I think Iguanas can read clocks!-even thru time change"

    I agree and they have an incredible memory.

    Two years ago we had 2 weeks of freak cold spell and after the first week many iguanas could be found on the ground close to death.
    I found 5 around my house and bought them in my garage . I left the car outside and ran a space heater and fed them . It wasn't the best set up but it was warm and they were safe till it got warmer.


    Either way ,one day I left my laptop in the garage and one got online and ordered iguana treats.

    Lol I am just goofing but you are correct they are smart and like birds I know they recognize hair color.


    One did die but 4 recovered with leaps and bounds and 2 weeks later I released them .
    I see one by area canal and she will come within 10 feet and look at me , yet she will dive in the water and flee if others go near her.

    Other than knight anoles I find the lizards smarter than many think.

    "But he has come to trust us."

    I do find the large adult males to be hot tempered and leary of them.
     
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